Wanted: This pickup driver, whose sticker is 'disorderly conduct,' Texas sheriff says

Wanted: This pickup driver, whose sticker is 'disorderly conduct,' Texas sheriff says

Wanted: This pickup driver, whose sticker is 'disorderly conduct,' Texas sheriff says

A sheriff in Texas is looking for a truck bearing a profanity-laced anti-Trump sticker and said authorities are considering charging its owner with disorderly conduct - a threat that immediately raised alarm among free speech advocates.

"They're fighting words because now you're challenging an individual, you're focused on that one person because it says, 'f you for voting for him, '" said Sheriff Troy Nehls of the Fort Bend County Sheriff's Department.

Nehls later responded to his Facebook post with a photo of the Texas criminal code that outlined potential laws the decal could violate.

"Our Prosecutor has informed us she would accept Disorderly Conduct charges regarding it, but I feel we could come to an agreement regarding a modification to it", the sheriff wrote.

Karen Cook Fonseca, who owns the truck with her husband, told CNN she put the decal up about 11 months ago.

She said she has been pulled over several times, but was always let go as sheriffs scratched their heads trying to figure out what they could charge her with.

"People have called and are offended by this language", the sheriff said at a news conference Wednesday.

On Twitter, users debated the fate of the sticker.

Argentina squander two-goal lead and lose to Nigeria
64-year-old Rohr, whose 3-5-2 formation against the South American giants appeared to work out fine, praised his boys for their "great team spirit" and strong determination during the game.

IEA oil demand forecast scaled back
Indeed, the IEA also suggests that demand for oil will remain supported by lower prices, going forward. This latest move comes as investors expect figures to show United States oil production has risen.

Disneyland shuts down cooling towers over Legionnaires' cases
Of the 12 cases of Legionnaire's disease that emerged in September, nine were among people who visited Disneyland in September. It brought the towers back into service November 5, but two days later, they were taken out of service again, she said.

The post has thousands of comments and shares. "That's our opinion on him", she said.

"It's just our freedom of speech and we're exercising it", she said. "I'm not fearful. There's too much positive, and it makes people smile. They want to shake your hand".

The sheriff's Facebook post sparked an intense discussion among commenters, with a number of them suggesting the First Amendment protected the phrase. Fonseca said she's surprised Nehls couldn't reach her.

Texas penal code describes disorderly conduct as "intentionally or knowingly [using] abusive, indecent, profane, or vulgar language in a public place, and the language by its very utterance tends to incite an immediate breach of peace". She receives some negative reactions, particularly among older white men, but most people stop to laugh, tell her stories or ask where to buy it, Fonseca said.

The American Civil Liberties Union posted on Facebook that "you can't prosecute speech just because it contains words you don't like".

District Attorney John Healey disputed Nehls' suggestion that disorderly conduct charges were appropriate in this case, as did free speech advocates.

Fonseca told the Chronicle that she often drives the truck, and that she actually used to work for Nehls at the county jail.

Related news