Charlie Gard's parents end legal fight as 'time runs out'

Charlie Gard's parents end legal fight as 'time runs out'

Charlie Gard's parents end legal fight as 'time runs out'

Parents of terminally ill baby Charlie Gard in the United Kingdom dropped their legal fight to bring him to the US for experimental treatment on Monday, saying "time has run out" for the 11-month-old fighting a rare genetic disease.

The parents of British baby Charlie Gard on Monday abandoned their legal fight to take him to the United States for experimental treatment in a case that has attracted global attention.

But the European Court of Human Rights had in June backed the view of doctors from Great Ormond Street, London, the hospital where Charlie was being treated, that further treatment would "continue to cause Charlie significant harm", without a serious prospect of recovery.

She said "a whole lot of time has been wasted" and said she hoped Charlie's life would not be in vain.

The child's parents raised $1.8 million to bring him to the U.S. They had previously said that if the money couldn't go towards Charlie's treatment, it would be donated to help other children with similar genetic conditions. "Due to the delay that chance has been lost".

The parents have been fighting in the courts for permission to have Charlie undergo treatment by Michio Hirano, a professor of neurology at New York's Columbia University Medical Center.

An American neurologist who visited him in hospital and had offered to provide experimental treatment in NY said that such intervention had only a 10% chance of improving his health. While parents usually decide what is best for their children, in some cases hospitals and parents disagree, he said.

"To Charlie we say mummy and daddy love you very much, we always have and we always will".

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"No parent could have done more for their child", he said.

It leads to weakened muscles and organ dysfunction, among other symptoms.

The case has drawn massive worldwide interest including high-profile interventions from President Donald Trump and Pope Francis in support of the family.

"This is one of the hardest things that we will ever have to say and we are about to do the hardest thing that we'll ever have to do - which is to let our lovely little Charlie go", mother Connie Yates said on Monday. Over the weekend, they communicated their desire to spend all the time they can with Charlie whilst working with the hospital to formulate the best possible plan for his end of life care. A ruling was made that the hospital could legally withdraw all treatment except for palliative care, going against what his parents, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, wanted.

"For Charlie, it's too late", the family's lawyer, Grant Armstrong, told London's High Court.

"We have more sorrow than we have words to say", Katie Gollop, a lawyer for the hospital, said. The court previously ruled that Gard's life-support machine should be switched off and that he should be allowed die with "dignity".

The judge has scheduled a two-day hearing to consider fresh evidence, after the doctor who was to conduct the treatment came to London to evaluate the child.

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