Turkey says European rights court has no jurisdiction over referendum

Speaking in an interview with broadcaster A Haber, Erdogan said challenging the results of the referendum was beyond the remit of Turkey's Constitutional Court and the European Court of Human Rights, after Turkey's main opposition vowed to take legal action against what it said were irregularities.

Opposition parties filed formal requests Tuesday to void the results over voting irregularities, particularly an electoral board decision to accept ballots without official stamps, as required by Turkish law.

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In response, CHP deputy chairman Bulent Tezcan said his party was considering taking its appeal to Turkey's Constitutional Court or the European Court of Human Rights.

On Wednesday, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım urged opposition parties not to contest the electoral board's ruling.

Turkey's state-run news agency says the country's electoral board has rejected the oppositions' petitions to annul the referendum on expanding the powers of the presidency.

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"What we are seeing is actually an attempt to consolidate state power in Turkey", said Halil Karaveli, a Sweden-based senior fellow at the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute and the Silk Road Studies Program.

Worldwide observers had said the decision to count the ballots "contradicted the law" and removed a safeguard against fraud.

The justice minister said the CHP was showing contempt for the people's will and tweeted, "No court can undo/change the decisions of the nation". "It is not right to correct the decision of the people by complaining to the courts".

The observers said a last-minute decision by election authorities to allow unstamped ballots to be counted "undermined an important safeguard and contradicted the law which explicitly states that such ballots should be considered invalid".

The worldwide monitors noted that the electoral board's move to validate ballots without the official stamps removed an important safeguard against fraud and was "contrary to the law".

The "Yes" camp won Sunday's poll with just 51.41 percent of the vote but the opposition has alleged there was foul play that swung the outcome of the vote. The legacy of the man whose surname means "father of Turks" was one of a modern, secular, western-leaning Turkey.

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