Google considering built-in Chrome ad-blocker in desktop and mobile versions

Google considering built-in Chrome ad-blocker in desktop and mobile versions

Google considering built-in Chrome ad-blocker in desktop and mobile versions

By targeting only the most disruptive ad formats - pop-ups, interstitials, and autoplay videos, for instance - the hope is that less people will be driven to third-party software. This feature, Wall Street Journal reports, would be turned on by default.

It is unusual that Google, a company which earns a significant portion of their revenue via online advertising would like to introduce an ad-blocking feature in their own browser.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Google is well aware of this and it's planning to add a built-in ad blocker to the Chrome browser.

Unacceptable ad types would be those recently defined by the Coalition for Better Ads, an industry group that released a list of ad standards in March.

Google experimented with generating income without showing display and banner ads on publisher sites in the United States.

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But the report claims that Google isn't interested in "blanket" blocks for all online ads.

It's not just you, online ads are getting worse. By offering a way to block only troublesome ads, Google may encourage more consumers to let some ads through, helping reverse the trend of total ad-blockage and the revenue issues that result.

Google's goal here seems clear: to reduce the use of ad platforms other than its own and punish sites who create a less than desirable experience for users.

While desktop ad blocking continues to grow in popularity worldwide, its mobile form has yet to catch on much outside of Asia. It's said that Google may choose to design the feature so that it blocks out all ads on a particular website if it detects that there is even a single ad that could cause a bad experience. This would give Google control over the ad-blocking market, the ad industry as a whole, and even over its competitors, which offer numerous "unacceptable ad" formats the coalition is targeting. While nothing is certain as of now, if Google is indeed trying to bring out such a feature, it could either spell doom for other ad providers, or it would be Google saying "foot, meet axe".

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